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He has been nominated for the The Strand Award for Best Debut Novel for The Yard, the The Dilys Award for The Black Country, and the Barry Award for Best First Novel for The Yard. He was also the recipient of the Kansas Notable Book Award from the State Library of Kansas for The Yard, The Black Country, and The Devil’s Workshop. Alex Grecian is an American author of short fiction, novels, comic books, and graphic novels.He has written an original ‘Murder Squad’ e-book, THE BLUE GIRL, and an original graphic novel, SEVEN SONS, as well as a multitude of short stories, both comics and prose, for various anthologies.Compare Trivially Obvious and Damned by Faint Praise.See also Medal of Dishonor, which may be given out in cases like these. Done all of the time unironically in film advertising the week after a film opens at the box office.Sometimes the joke is that, even in such an incredibly narrow category, the thing being discussed isn't first.Creators may describe their own works this way as a form of humorous Self-Deprecation; it can also be a way to imply that a work, while bad, at least has a unique premise—it's better than any other of its type because there no other.

The stock piece of dialogue that fits this trope goes something like: Contrast Mathematician's Answer, which is equally meaningless but for the opposite reason, and Suspiciously Specific Denial, where the specificity is worrisome for the opposite reason.

Film ads that week will try to claim their picture was "the #1 film in America!

His most notable works include long-running and critically acclaimed graphic novel series Proof, which NPR named one of the best books of 2009, and the novels in the Scotland Yard’s Murder Squad: THE YARD, THE BLACK COUNTRY, THE DEVIL’S WORKSHOP, and THE HARVEST MAN.

The fifth book in the series LOST AND GONE FOREVER was released May 2016. He is working on the sixth novel of Scotland Yard’s Murder Squad.

This trope covers situations where something seems to be highly praised, and it's relative to an extremely small — or intrinsically awful — group (often a group of one), rendering it meaningless.

Sometimes the intent is for the praise to be taken seriously (in which case it becomes a version of the Sharpshooter Fallacy), but the more frequent implication is that there isn't any larger category relative to which it can apply, making it a Stealth Insult (if the backhandedness of the compliment is not immediately obvious) or a form of Damned by Faint Praise (if it is).

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